A Prospect Too Far

Almost got to the Barnett Prospect but the terrain, time, and not enough water defeated me. I could see the area from the furthest point I reached, only .14 miles away. Yet another five hundred feet of gain. Too much.

I am now taking prescription medicine for my leg and I now have a referral for physical therapy. Perhaps with work I can hike like I used to. Or something similar. Those 4,000 foot gain hikes, though, are probably done. Goodbye Mount Diablo and Pyramid Peak! They were always too much work, anyway.:-)

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The leading report says this, Barnett Prospect The Barnett prospect is located on top of a precipitous ridge in the northern part of the study area approximately 2.5 mi south of the Nancy Ann mine (fig. 2). The prospect is accessible by a foot trail from Chicago Valley. A trench was dug in a 2-ft-thick gossan zone of dark-red to brown limonite, geothite, and remnant galena in massive Ely Springs Dolomite. A grab sample collected from a 1-ton-stockpile of galena-bearing gossan material contained 31 percent lead and 19.75 oz/ton silver. However, chip samples collected across the gossan zone contained only 0.05 to 2.6 percent lead and 0.02 to 0.22 oz/ton silver. Two pits and a 29-ft crosscut adit were found in a dark-red clay bed sandwiched between massive dolomite beds. The clay bed is as much as 6 in. thick and was traced for 80 ft along strike. Samples of the clay contained 0.15 to 7.8 percent lead and 0.02 to 0.44 oz/ton silver. Because high concentrations of silver and lead in a clay bed are unusual, it deserves further study. The bed displays no shearing or discordance to indicate that it is a fault gouge, and does not show any evidence of hydrothermal alteration. The identified silver and lead occurrences are too small to constitute a resource.#geology #geologyrocks #mining #inyocounty#nopah#rocks#silver#lead#exploring#getoutside#mojave#mojavedesert #explore#mines#rockhounding#geologistonboard

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Rolf Luetcke on Fossils

Hi Tom,

Besides being an “old fossil” , my fossil hunting actually goes back to when I was a kid in Germany. My dads’ family house was near a small town and they had a nice piece of land with the old family house on it. The whole area around the house was crushed rock that was brought in to make an area that didn’t get muddy during rains. In among the pieces of rock there were crinoid fossils. I would sit for hours looking in the gravel for pieces with the rounded fossils in them. I had no idea what they were but I remember looking for them.

Never got into fossils in a big way either but knew a bit about them from my college days.

Didn’t get back to fossils until I moved where we are now. I was taking the dogs on morning walks and when I walked, I rarely slowed down, I have always had a fast pace when I am out and hiking. But, having to pee does make one stop and on one hike I stopped to pee and then always looked around and to my amazement, found a bone in a piece of rock just about a mile West of our house. If I had just found the bone I may not have noticed much but thought it was something a coyote had lost but in this case, the bone was par of the rock of the area, a white caliche like material. That got me looking and before long I saw little bone fragments all over the place.

Home again I researched this and got in touch with the University in Tucson. One of the guys there sent me a paper he had written on the fossil history of the San Pedro River Valley. It seems this area was a study area for major Universities from a few places back in the 1930’s and 40’s. They had found this area rich in mammal fossils from recent times to about 5 million years. I was hooked and started looking more and more. Found a bunch of things and was able to identify quite a few species in what I had come across.

Found all sorts of things of the mammal fossils from the area, including Camel, Mastadon, Rhino, Horse and many more. Fun stuff and I have a nice display in the shop/museum of the finds.

There are a number of much more ancient fossils also in the area and those stones I sent photos of are examples.

Lots of shell fossils in the area limestones too. One spot between Tombstone and Bisbee has wonderful layers and each one a different kind of shell life in it.

Never did get into fossils as I did minerals but it was fun to learn some of the history of the area.

One that was both mineral, fossil and lapidary material is Turitella, a fossil material from the West. I got some nice big pieces of it and did a few into jewelry, quite hard stuff. You may look into getting some for your cutting.

Here is a photo of the Turitella I did a cabachon of, neat stuff.

This is fossil Auricaria cone from Argentina, this piece a friend gave me to cut. This material is somewhat protected now by the Argentine govt. it was mostly smuggled out before.

This one is Stromatolite, a fossil algae, and quite ancient. Got some of this to cut from the Illinois friend.

My knowledge of fossils is not that good but I have had fun with the material I have come across.

I am sure you will come across some also in hunting rock. Petrified wood, or pet wood as we call it, is a good example.

Take care

Rolf

Continuing On With all Matters Right and Relevant




Getting Closer to the Barnett Prospect









Toward The Barnett Prospect

Barnett Prospect

The Barnett prospect is located on top of a precipitous ridge in the northern part of the study area
approximately 2.5 mi south of the Nancy Ann mine (fig. 2). The prospect is accessible by a foot trail from
Chicago Valley. A trench was dug in a 2-ft-thick gossan zone of dark-red to brown limonite, geothite, and remnant
galena in massive Ely Springs Dolomite. A grab sample collected from a 1-ton-stockpile of galenabearing gossan material contained 31 percent lead and 19.75 oz/ton silver. However, chip samples collected across the gossan zone contained only 0.05 to 2.6percent lead and 0.02 to 0.22 oz/ton silver.

Two pits and a 29-ft crosscut adit were found in a dark-red clay bed sandwiched between massivedolomite beds. The clay bed is as much as 6 in. thick and was traced for 80 ft along strike. Samples of the clay contained 0.15 to 7.8 percent lead and 0.02 to 0.44 oz/ton silver. Because high concentrations of silver and lead in a clay bed are unusual, it deserves further study. The bed displays no shearing or discordance to indicate that it is a fault gouge, and does not show any evidence of hydrothermal alteration. The identified silver and lead occurrences are too small to constitute a resource.

Mineral Resources of the Nopah Range Wilderness Study Area, Inyo County, California

Armstrong, Smith and Kennedy, USGS, Sabine and Mayerle, U.S. Bureau of Mines

1987



Upcoming Hike to the Barnett Prospect in Inyo County, California


Another Road, Another Mystery




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No quartz despite what I said in the video. False hopes and poorly correcting sunglasses. All lode claims were located by Paul J Flannery in 1981 in Inyo County. They were the 'YELLOW DAISY', the 'VALENTINE', the 'SUNRISE' and the 'SUNSET. Closed in 183, possibly due to no luck or the move of the Resting Springs Range into Wilderness status. I thought this was the North Nopah WA but was mistaken. Haven't determined what they were looking for, I am going to look at my reference samples tonight to see if I can figure this out. Macrostrat.org's overview of these rocks says, Name: Cambrian marine rocks Age: Neoproterozoic – Middle Devonian (1000 – 382.7Ma) Stratigraphic name(s): Bonanza King Formation; Bright Angel Shale; Cadiz Formation; Campito Formation; Carrara Formation; Chambless Limestone; Cornfield Springs Formation; Goodsprings Dolomite; Harkless Formation; Latham Shale; Lead Gulch Formation; Lotus Formation; Monola… Lithology: Major:{sandstone,dolostone}, Minor:{mudstone,limestone,quartzite}, Incidental:{conglomerate, siltstone, chert} Description: Sandstone, shale, limestone, dolomite, chert, quartzite, and phyllite; includes some rocks that are possibly Precambrian I'd have to look at the USGS geologic map for this area to get a clue as to minerals. Minerals not always listed or very lightly treated. This is not the end of the road as I was to find.#geology #geologyrocks#inyocounty#mining#explore#getoutdoors#mojavedesert#restingspringsrange #rocks#minerals

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Quick Nighttime Fluorescent Mineral Hunt